What is the utility of pulmonary auscultation for crackles (rales) in diagnosing congestive heart failure (CHF) or pneumonia?

The evidence for the accuracy of crackles in CHF is not as robust as often assumed, with wide variations in its sensitivity (13%-70%), specificity (35%-100%), positive predictive value (19%-100%), and negative predictive value (17%-85%) (1). In a study  of patients at high risk for CHF but without valvular heart disease, symptoms of CHF, or comorbid pulmonary disease,  the prevalence of baseline crackles in one or both lungs increased with age: 45-64 y , 11%; 65-79 y, 34%; and 80-95 y, 70%.  Overall, an at best fair or poor negative likelihood ratios (LRs) have been reported for crackles in CHF (3.4, and 0.8, respectively)(2). 

The accuracy of crackles in diagnosing pneumonia in patients with cough and fever is not much better: sensitivity 19-67%, specificity 36-94%, and poor positive and negative LRs (1.8 and 0.8, respectively) (2).

So don’t overestimate the accuracy of crackles in CHF or pneumonia!

  1. Kataoka H, Matsuno O. Age-related pulmonary crackles (rales) in asymptomatic cardiovascular patients. Ann Fam Med 2008;6:239-245.
  2. McGee S. Auscultation of the lungs. In Evidence-based physical diagnosis (3rd ed.). Elsevier Saunders, Philadelphia, 2012.
What is the utility of pulmonary auscultation for crackles (rales) in diagnosing congestive heart failure (CHF) or pneumonia?

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