My 35 year old patient with Crohn’s disease has peripheral neuropathy but no anemia or macrocytosis. Could he still have vitamin B-12 deficiency?

Absolutely! A significant number of patients with B-12 deficiency are neither anemic nor have macrocytosis but may still have related neurological symptoms.

A large study involving a nationally representative sample of older U.S. adults (aged >50 y) sponsored by the CDC reported a prevalence of B-12 deficiency without anemia or without macrocytosis of about 4% each . 1 Interestingly, in this study,  there was no evidence that mandatory folic acid fortification of certain foods was associated with lower prevalence of B-12 deficiency without anemia or macrocytosis.

In another study, the proportion of subjects with low serum B-12 but without macrocytosis was 70% or higher, irrespective of pre- or post-fortification period.2 Interestingly, in the age group <65 y, the post-fortification was associated with significantly higher proportion of patients without macrocytosis (85% vs. 45% in the prefortification period) in this study.

Younger age groups seem to also be overrepresented among patients with B-12 deficiency but no anemia, with a prevalence of 50% in <60 y age group with B-12 deficiency compared to 38% and 31% among older age groups (60-74 y and >74 y, respectively).3

So, keep B-12 deficiency in mind in the presence of compatible neurological symptoms even in the absence anemia or macrocytosis!

 

References

  1. Qi YP, Do AN, Hamner HC, et al. The prevalence of low serum vitamin B-12 status in the absence of anemia or macrocytosis did not increase among older U.S. adults after mandatory folic acid fortification. J Nutr 2014;144:170-76. http://jn.nutrition.org/content/144/2/170.abstract
  2. Wyckoff KF, Ganji V. Proportion of individuals with low serum vitamin B-12 concentrations without macrocytosis is higher in the post-folic acid fortification period than in the pre-folic acid fortification period. Am J Clin Nutr 2007;86:1187-92. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17921401
  3. Mills JL, Von Kohorn I, Conley MR, et al. Low vitamin B-12 concentrations in patients without anemia: the effect of folic acid fortification of grain. Am J Clin Nutr 2003;77:1474-7. http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/77/6/1474.full.pdf+html
My 35 year old patient with Crohn’s disease has peripheral neuropathy but no anemia or macrocytosis. Could he still have vitamin B-12 deficiency?

How should I interpret high serum vitamin B12 levels in my patient with anemia?

High serum B12 levels, aka hypercobalaminemia (HC),  is not rare among hospitalized patients with 1 study reporting “high” (813-1355 pg/ml) and “very high” (>1355 pg/ml) serum B12 levels in 13 and 7% of patients, respectively1.

Common causes include excess B12 intake, solid neoplasms (particularly, hepatocellular carcinoma and metastatic neoplastic liver disease), blood disorders (eg, myelodysplastic syndrome, CML, and acute leukemias, particularly AML3), and other liver diseases, including alcohol-related diseases as well as acute and chronic hepatitis.  Other inflammatory states and renal failure have also been reported2.  

Paradoxically, even in the presence of HC, a functional B12 deficiency may still exist. This may be related to poor B12 delivery to cells due to its high binding by transport proteins transcobalamin I and III in HC which may in turn cause a decrease in the binding of B12 to transcobalamin II, a key player in B12 transport to tissues2.  In this setting, elevated serum methylmalonic acid and homocysteine levels may be helpful.

References:

  1. Arendt JFB, Nexo E. Cobalamin related parameters and disease patterns in patients with increased serum cobalamin levels. PLoS ONE 2012;9:e45979. https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0045979
  2. Andres E, Serraj K, Zhu J. et al. The pathophysiology of elevated vitamin B12 in clinical practice. Q J Med 2013;106:505-515.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23447660
How should I interpret high serum vitamin B12 levels in my patient with anemia?