My elderly patient developed a flare-up of her gout few days after receiving Covid-19 vaccine. Is there a connection between immunization and gout flare?

Although the connection between Covid-19 vaccination and gout flare has yet to be established, higher rates of gout/gout flare following the administration of several other vaccines (eg, influenza, tetatnus, recombinant zoster) have been reported.1  Thus, it is conceivable that Covid-19 vaccine may also be associated with gout flare as more and more people are immunized.  

A 2019 prospective study of over 500 patients with gout found that vaccination was associated with 2-fold higher odds of gout flare (aO.R. 1.99; 95% ci 1.01-3.89) during the 2 day period following immunization; no information on the type of vaccines administered was provided, however.1  Similarly,  higher risk of gout (3.6-fold) has been reported in recipients of recombinant zoster vaccine following immunization.1

An intriguing mechanism explaining the association of vaccination and gout flare is the activation of the Nlrp3 inflammasome, a multiprotein complex produced in response to diverse stimuli such as uric acid crystals and ATP released from tissue injury/necrotic cells.2 Of interest, ~25% of patients with asymptomatic hyperuricemia have been found to have evidence of monosodium urate crystals in and around their joints by advanced imaging, such that vaccination may potentially bring out more inflammatory response and gout flare.

Although aluminum adjuvants intended to increase the immunogenicity of one-half of all routine adult vaccines (eg, tetanus, diphteria, pertussis) have been shown to activate the Nlrp3 inflammasome in vitro, neither currently available mRNA vaccines (Pfizer, Moderna) nor the Johnson&Johnson vaccine contains aluminum as an adjuvant. 4  

Despite the potential for gout flare following adult vaccination, it should be emphasized that the absolute risk is still low and pales compared to the overwhelming benefits of vaccination in general.1

Bonus Pearl: Did you know that, in addition to the usual uric acid lowering drugs, losartan, fenofibrate and some non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as indomethacin, also lower serum uric acid levels? 5,6

Liked this post? Download the app on your smart phone and sign up below to catch future pearls right into your inbox, all for free!

Subscribe to Blog via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

References

  1. Yokose C, McCormick N, Chen C, et al. Risk of gout flares after vaccination: a prospective case-crossoverstudy. Ann Rheum Dis 2019;78:1601-1604. https://ard.bmj.com/content/early/2019/07/31/annrheumdis-2019-215724.info?versioned=true
  2. Lyer SS, Pulskens WP, Sadler JJ, et al. Necrotic cells trigger a sterile inflammatory response throught the Nlrp3 inflammasome. PNAS 2009;106:20388-20393. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/19918053/
  3. Yokose C, Choi H. Response to “Clarification regarding the statement of the association between the recombinant zoster vaccine (RZV) and gout flares’ by Didierlaurent etal. Ann Rheum Dis Month, December 2019. https://ard.bmj.com/content/annrheumdis/early/2019/12/18/annrheumdis-2019-216670.full.pdf
  4. Covid-19 vaccine information. https://covidvaccine.mo.gov/ Accessed March 16, 2021.
  5. Daskalopoulou SS, Tzovaras V, Mikhailidis DP, et al. Effect on serum uric acid levels of drugs prescribed for indications other than treating hyperuricaemia. Current Pharmaceutical Design 2005;11:4161-75. https://www.eurekaselect.com/60510/article
  6. Tiitinen S, Nissila M, Ruutsalo HM, et al. Effect of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on the renal excretion of uric acid. Clin Rheumatol 1983;2:233-6. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/6678696/#:~:text=The%20effect%20of%209%20nonsteroidal,studied%20had%20no%20significant%20influence.

Disclosures: The listed questions and answers are solely the responsibility of the author and do not necessarily represent the official views of Mercy Hospital-St. Louis or its affiliate healthcare centers. Although every effort has been made to provide accurate information, the author is far from being perfect. The reader is urged to verify the content of the material with other sources as deemed appropriate and exercise clinical judgment in the interpretation and application of the information provided herein. No responsibility for an adverse outcome or guarantees for a favorable clinical result is assumed by the author. Thank you!

My elderly patient developed a flare-up of her gout few days after receiving Covid-19 vaccine. Is there a connection between immunization and gout flare?

Is my patient with gout at higher risk of cancer?

Although the association of gout with cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus or obesity is well known, increasingly number of epidemiologic studies support the association of gout with higher risk of malignancy. 1,2

A 2015 meta-analysis of 3 studies involving over 50,000 persons concluded that gout was an independent risk factor for cancer, particularly urological, gastrointestinal and lung cancers. 1

A population-based study of comorbidities in over 2 million persons in Sweden found that in addition to an increased risk of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, chronic heart failure, chronic kidney disease and alcohol abuse, gout was associated with increased risk of malignancy: odds ratio 1.3 (1.2-1.5) in men and 1.1 (1.1-1.2) in women. 2

Although serum uric acid has been considered to have anti-oxidant properties, a prospective study of over 28,000 women followed over a median of 15.2 years did not find high serum acid levels to be protective of cancer.3 In fact, uric acid levels > 5.4 mg/dL at the time of subject enrollment was independently associated with increased risk of total cancer mortality and deaths from a variety of malignant neoplasms, including those of breast, female genital organs, and nervous systems. 3 In a similar prospective study involving men, high uric acid levels (>6.7 mg/dL) were associated with increased risk of mortality from gastrointestinal, respiratory and intrathoracic organ malignancies. 4

Whether the observed association between gout and higher risk of malignancy is causal or due to the company that gout often keeps (eg, lifestyle) is unclear.

Fun fact: Did you know that among mammals, only humans, great apes and certain breeds of dogs (eg, Dalmation) produce elevated levels of uric acid in the urine and blood? 5

Liked this post? Download the app on your smart phone and sign up below to catch future pearls right into your inbox, all for free!

Subscribe to Blog via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

References

  1. Wang W, Xu D, Wang B, et al. Increased risk of cancer in relation to gout: a review of three prospective cohort studies with 50,358 subjects. Mediators of Inflammation 2015, Article ID 680853, 6 pages. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26504360
  2. Wandell P. Gout and its comorbidities in the total population of Stockholm. Preventive Medicine 2015; 81:387-91. ISSN 0091-7435. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26500085
  3. Strasak AM, Rapp K, Hilbe W, et al. The role of serum uric acid as an antioxidant protecting against cancer: prospective study in more than 28000 older Austrian women. Ann Onc 2007;18:1893-97. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17785768
  4. Strasak Am, Hilbe RK, Oberaingner W, et al. Serum uric acid and risk of cancer mortality in a large prospective male cohort. Cancer Causes Control 2007;18:1021-9. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17665312
  5. Bannasch D, Safra N, Young A, et al. Mutations in the SLC2A9 gene cause hyperuriosuria and hyperuricemia in the dog. PLOS Genet 2008;4:e1000246. https://journals.plos.org/plosgenetics/article/file?id=10.1371/journal.pgen.1000246&type=printable
Is my patient with gout at higher risk of cancer?