Should patients previously immunized against Covid-19 receive selected monoclonal antibodies when diagnosed with a breakthrough infection?

Although published studies supporting monoclonal antibody therapy in mild to moderate Covid-19 preceded availability of Covid-19 vaccines and the emergence of new variants of concern,1,2 given the possibility of severe breakthrough Covid-19 in high risk vaccinated patients with suboptimal immunity and the retained activity of certain monoclonal antibody products (ie, casirivimab and imdevimab-Regeneron-Cov and sotrovimab) against common variants of SARS-CoV-2 , their use is recommended even in vaccinated individuals with mild to moderate Covid-19.3-5

In fact, the CDC states that “For people who have received one or more doses of Covid-19 vaccine and subsequently experience SARS-CoV-2 infection, prior receipt of a Covid-19 vaccine should not affect treatment decisions (including use of monoclonal antibodies, convalescent plasma, antiviral treatment, or corticosteroid administration) or timing of such treatment.”3

In its July 30, 2021 Emergency Authorization Use (EUA) letter regarding use of casirivimab and imdevimab – REGEN-COV), the FDA does not distinguish between vaccinated and unvaccinated individuals for its indications,4 similar to those of guidelines posted by the Department of Health and Human Services and the NIH.5-6

When indicated, high risk vaccinated individuals with Covid-19 should be offered  an FDA approved (under EUA currently) monoclonal antibody product (such as  casirivimab and imdevimab antibody cocktail or sotrovimab) soon after diagnosis and certainly no later than 10 days.

Vaccinated individuals with mild to moderate Covid-19 not requiring hospitalization and for whom monoclonal antibody treatment may be indicated include older patients and those with risk factors for severe disease, such as obesity, pregnancy, chronic kidney disease, chronic lung disease (including COPD), immunocompromised state, serious heart conditions (eg, heart failure, coronary artery disease, cardiomyopathies), sickle cell disease and type 2 diabetes.7

Of note, casirivimab and imdevimab is indicated for adults (weighing at least 40 kg) and children 12 years or older and is administered by IV infusion or subcutaneously, if IV infusion is not feasible and would lead to delay in treatment.4

Bonus Pearl: Did you know that in phase III trials, casirivimab and imdevimab  antibody cocktail reduced hospitalization or death by 70% in non-hospitalized patients with Covid-19?2

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References

  1. Interim clinical considerations for use of Covid-19 vaccines currently authorized in the United States. 2021. Available at https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/covid-19/info-by-product/clinical-considerations.html. Accessed August 22, 2021.
  2. March 23, 2021 https://www.roche.com/media/releases/med-cor-2021-03-23.htm
  3. Dougan M, Nirula A, Azizad M, et al. Bamlanivimab plus Etesevimab in mild or moderate Covid-19. N Engl J Med, July 14, 2021. https://www.nejm.org/doi/10.1056/NEJMoa2102685
  4. Letter, EUA REGEN-COV, July 30, 2021. https://www.fda.gov/media/145610/download
  5. Department of Health and Human Services. High risk Covid-19 outpatients may avoid hospitalization with monoclonal antibody treatment. July 16, 2021. https://combatcovid.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/documents/High-Risk-COVID-19-Outpatients-072021.pdf
  6. Anti-SARS Cov-2 monoclonal antibodies. Accessed August 22, 2021. https://www.covid19treatmentguidelines.nih.gov/therapies/anti-sars-cov-2-antibody-products/anti-sars-cov-2-monoclonal-antibodies/
  7. Science brief: evidence used to update the list of underlying medical conditions that increase a person’s risk of severe illness from Covid-19. Accessed August 22, 2021. https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/science/science-briefs/underlying-evidence-table.html

Disclosures: The listed questions and answers are solely the responsibility of the author and do not necessarily represent the official views of Mercy-St. Louis, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Catalyst, Harvard University, their affiliate healthcare centers, or its contributors. Although every effort has been made to provide accurate information, the author is far from being perfect. The reader is urged to verify the content of the material with other sources as deemed appropriate and exercise clinical judgment in the interpretation and application of the information provided herein. No responsibility for an adverse outcome or guarantees for a favorable clinical result is assumed by the author. Thank you!

Should patients previously immunized against Covid-19 receive selected monoclonal antibodies when diagnosed with a breakthrough infection?

What’s the effectiveness of Covid-19 vaccination in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) treated with high-efficacy disease-modifying therapies?

The answer appears to be dependent on which high-efficacy disease-modifying agent is being used to treat MS.  Limited data suggest that cladribine treatment does not impair humoral response to Covid-19 vaccine in patients with MS, while ocrelizumab and fingolimod have a major negative impact on vaccine responsiveness based on humoral antibody measurements.1

A study involving 125 Covid-19 MS vaccine (mRNA, Pfizer BNT162b2) recipients  (58% females, 61% relapse-remitting, 19% primary-progressive, 14% secondary-progressive, 3% clinically isolated syndrome and 2% radiologically isolated syndrome), found high levels of SARS-CoV-2 anti-spike IgG in all subjects (n=23) receiving cladribine as early as 4.4 months from last treatment dose.1

In contrast only 4% of patients with MS treated with fingolimod had a post-vaccination humoral response (time-interval from last treatment dose to vaccination not reported).  Similarly, most patients under treatment with ocrelizumab failed to develop a post-vaccination humoral response, with only 23% demonstrating a protective antibody titer (time-interval from last treatment dose 3.1-8.9 months).

These results may not be totally surprising given the attenuated humoral response to several common vaccines in patients with MS treated with ocrelizumab or fingolimod.2,3

Given the potential suboptimal response to Covid-19 vaccine in patients with MS treated with fingolimod or ocrelizumab, until further data become available, it’s fair to state that patients treated with these agents should NOT depend on vaccination to protect them from Covid-19 and that they may need to still take extra precautions during the pandemic.   

 

Bonus Pearl: Did you know that fingolimod prevents lymphocyte egression from secondary lymphoid tissue and ocrelizumab is an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody that depletes B lymphocytes?1

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Reference

  1. Achiron A, Mandel M, Dreyer-Alster S, et al. Humoral immune response to COVID-19 mRNA vaccine in patients with multiple sclerosis treated with high-efficacy disease-modifying therapies. Therapeutic Adances in Neurological Disorders 2021;14:1-8. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/17562864211012835
  2. Bar-Or A, Calkwood JC, Chognot C, et al. Effect of ocrelizumab on vaccine responses in patients with multiple sclerosis. Neurology 2020; 95:e1999-22008. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32727835/
  3. Kappos L, Mehling M, Arroyo R, et al. Randomized trial of vaccination in fingolimod-treated patients with multiple sclerosis. Neurology 2015;84:872-9. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25636714/  

Disclosures: The listed questions and answers are solely the responsibility of the author and do not necessarily represent the official views of Mercy Hospital-St. Louis or its affiliate healthcare centers, Mass General Hospital, Harvard Medical School or its affiliated institutions. Although every effort has been made to provide accurate information, the author is far from being perfect. The reader is urged to verify the content of the material with other sources as deemed appropriate and exercise clinical judgment in the interpretation and application of the information provided herein. No responsibility for an adverse outcome or guarantees for a favorable clinical result is assumed by the author. Thank you!

What’s the effectiveness of Covid-19 vaccination in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) treated with high-efficacy disease-modifying therapies?

My elderly patient developed a flare-up of her gout few days after receiving Covid-19 vaccine. Is there a connection between immunization and gout flare?

Although the connection between Covid-19 vaccination and gout flare has yet to be established, higher rates of gout/gout flare following the administration of several other vaccines (eg, influenza, tetatnus, recombinant zoster) have been reported.1  Thus, it is conceivable that Covid-19 vaccine may also be associated with gout flare as more and more people are immunized.  

A 2019 prospective study of over 500 patients with gout found that vaccination was associated with 2-fold higher odds of gout flare (aO.R. 1.99; 95% ci 1.01-3.89) during the 2 day period following immunization; no information on the type of vaccines administered was provided, however.1  Similarly,  higher risk of gout (3.6-fold) has been reported in recipients of recombinant zoster vaccine following immunization.1

An intriguing mechanism explaining the association of vaccination and gout flare is the activation of the Nlrp3 inflammasome, a multiprotein complex produced in response to diverse stimuli such as uric acid crystals and ATP released from tissue injury/necrotic cells.2 Of interest, ~25% of patients with asymptomatic hyperuricemia have been found to have evidence of monosodium urate crystals in and around their joints by advanced imaging, such that vaccination may potentially bring out more inflammatory response and gout flare.

Although aluminum adjuvants intended to increase the immunogenicity of one-half of all routine adult vaccines (eg, tetanus, diphteria, pertussis) have been shown to activate the Nlrp3 inflammasome in vitro, neither currently available mRNA vaccines (Pfizer, Moderna) nor the Johnson&Johnson vaccine contains aluminum as an adjuvant. 4  

Despite the potential for gout flare following adult vaccination, it should be emphasized that the absolute risk is still low and pales compared to the overwhelming benefits of vaccination in general.1

Bonus Pearl: Did you know that, in addition to the usual uric acid lowering drugs, losartan, fenofibrate and some non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as indomethacin, also lower serum uric acid levels? 5,6

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References

  1. Yokose C, McCormick N, Chen C, et al. Risk of gout flares after vaccination: a prospective case-crossoverstudy. Ann Rheum Dis 2019;78:1601-1604. https://ard.bmj.com/content/early/2019/07/31/annrheumdis-2019-215724.info?versioned=true
  2. Lyer SS, Pulskens WP, Sadler JJ, et al. Necrotic cells trigger a sterile inflammatory response throught the Nlrp3 inflammasome. PNAS 2009;106:20388-20393. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/19918053/
  3. Yokose C, Choi H. Response to “Clarification regarding the statement of the association between the recombinant zoster vaccine (RZV) and gout flares’ by Didierlaurent etal. Ann Rheum Dis Month, December 2019. https://ard.bmj.com/content/annrheumdis/early/2019/12/18/annrheumdis-2019-216670.full.pdf
  4. Covid-19 vaccine information. https://covidvaccine.mo.gov/ Accessed March 16, 2021.
  5. Daskalopoulou SS, Tzovaras V, Mikhailidis DP, et al. Effect on serum uric acid levels of drugs prescribed for indications other than treating hyperuricaemia. Current Pharmaceutical Design 2005;11:4161-75. https://www.eurekaselect.com/60510/article
  6. Tiitinen S, Nissila M, Ruutsalo HM, et al. Effect of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on the renal excretion of uric acid. Clin Rheumatol 1983;2:233-6. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/6678696/#:~:text=The%20effect%20of%209%20nonsteroidal,studied%20had%20no%20significant%20influence.

Disclosures: The listed questions and answers are solely the responsibility of the author and do not necessarily represent the official views of Mercy Hospital-St. Louis or its affiliate healthcare centers. Although every effort has been made to provide accurate information, the author is far from being perfect. The reader is urged to verify the content of the material with other sources as deemed appropriate and exercise clinical judgment in the interpretation and application of the information provided herein. No responsibility for an adverse outcome or guarantees for a favorable clinical result is assumed by the author. Thank you!

My elderly patient developed a flare-up of her gout few days after receiving Covid-19 vaccine. Is there a connection between immunization and gout flare?

Can my patient with Covid-19 get reinfected?

Patients with prior history of Covid-19 have been shown to get reinfected, sometimes less severe and sometimes more severe than the first bout.1-3 What we don’t really know is how often reinfection actually occurs, either with or without symptoms.

Symptomatic reinfection with genetically distinct SARS-CoV-2 following Covid-19 has been reported from several countries, including the USA. 1  A case series of 4 patients (age range of 33-51 y) found the severity of second infection ranging from asymptomatic to more severe disease requiring hospitalization.  First infection was mild in these cases with an intervening period of 48-142 days.1  BNO News, a Dutch website, lists many more “officially confirmed cases” as well as over a thousand “suspected reinfection cases”.4

Reinfection with Covid-19 in at least some people should not be too surprising. Some may have a suboptimal immune response to the first infection (eg with mild infection) that may be short-lasting, while others may have a better response.  Even in those with adequate response, SARS-CoV-2 antibodies may drop rapidly (half-life 36 days according to one study).3 Immunity to several other seasonal respiratory coronaviruses (cousins of SARS-CoV-2) also seems short lived (as short as 6 months).5 How much other arms of the immune system besides antibodies (eg, T cell immunity) play a role in conferring longer lasting immunity remains unclear.

These findings suggest that we cannot rely on natural infection to provide us individual or herd immunity.  Immunization is likely a better answer!

Bonus Pearl: Did you know that preliminary reports suggest that antibody loss with Covid-19 is more rapid than that found for SARS-CoV-1, the agent of SARS pandemic of 2003?3

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References

  1. Iwasaki A. What reinfections mean for COVID-19. Lancet Infect Dis 2020. Published online October 12, 2020. https://www.thelancet.com/journals/laninf/article/PIIS1473-3099(20)30783-0/fulltext
  2. Tillett RL, Sevinsky JR, Hartley PD, et al. Genomic evidence for reinfection with SARS-CoV-2: a case study. Lancet Infect Dis 2020. Published online October 12, 2020. https://www.thelancet.com/pdfs/journals/laninf/PIIS1473-3099(20)30764-7.pdf
  3. Ibarrondo J, Fulcher JA, Goodman-Meza D, et al. Rapid decay of anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies in persons with mild Covid-19. N Engl J Med 2020; September 10. https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/nejmc2025179
  4. Kunzman K. Contagion Live. October 12, 2020. https://www.contagionlive.com/view/us-reports-first-confirmed-covid-19-reinfection-patient. Accessed Dec 23, 2020.
  5. Edridge AWD, Kaczorowska J, Hoste ACR, et al. Seasonal coronavirus protective immunity is short-lasting. Nature Medicine 2020;26:1691-93. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32929268/

Disclosures: The listed questions and answers are solely the responsibility of the author and do not necessarily represent the official views of Mercy Hospital-St. Louis or its affiliate healthcare centers. Although every effort has been made to provide accurate information, the author is far from being perfect. The reader is urged to verify the content of the material with other sources as deemed appropriate and exercise clinical judgment in the interpretation and application of the information provided herein. No responsibility for an adverse outcome or guarantees for a favorable clinical result is assumed by the author. Thank you!

 

 

Can my patient with Covid-19 get reinfected?