What’s the latest on second Covid vaccine boosters and should I recommend them to my adult patients?

On March 29, 2022, the CDC and the FDA approved second booster shots of Pfizer and Moderna Covid vaccines for everyone 50 years of age or older as well as people 12 years of age or older with moderate to severe immune deficiencies to be given at least 4 months following the first booster.1-3  This means a 4th dose of an mRNA vaccine for many adults and a 5th dose for those with moderate to severe immune deficiencies. 

Admittedly, these recommendations are made in the context of many uncertainties, including when the next Covid surge will arrive, what will be the predominant variant, and how will our immunity hold up if a surge occurs. 

Nevertheless, in discussing the merits of a 2nd booster, I would emphasize several “talking points”:

  • Covid hasn’t gone away with new cases still diagnosed daily, some still  requiring hospitalization, albeit at lower frequency than recent past. 
  • Our immunity against Covid wanes in the absence of boosters or natural infection.
  • SARS-CoV-2 has been unpredictable in its surges, as well as emergence of new variants with frequent changes in its virulence and ease of transmission. This means we don’t know when the next surge will hit us (summer, fall or later) and how the predominant variant will behave.
  • But let’s not get too hung up on surges! The fact is that as long as Covid is circulating around, maintaining a robust immunity against infection is the best way to avoid getting infected and the best way to do this is through boosters!
  • As more people go around without masks, the risk of unprotected exposure to SARS-CoV-2 is also likely to increase, particularly in indoor public gatherings.  Boosters may allow us the freedom to go maskless more often!
  • The risk of Long Covid even following mild infection is still real even between surges. This means even if we don’t get very sick from Covid, we are placing ourselves at risk of Long Covid. Remember, no Covid, no Long Covid!
  • Irrespective of whether it’s mild or even asymptomatic, Covid infection  can cause significant disruption in our lives, whether it be isolation at home, not being allowed to return to work or just the anxiety of having it or having passed it to others. This means that, at least currently, it’s premature to consider this virus as “just another respiratory virus.”  It’s impact on our everyday lives is still a lot different than typical respiratory viruses. 
  • mRNA vaccine boosters have been proven to be as safe as primary series. 
  • Last, but not the least, a preprint Israeli study involving volunteers 60 to 100 years old found a 78% reduction in mortality from Covid following a 2nd booster dose of Pfizer mRNA vaccine compared to those who only had 1 booster.This study has several limitations including self-selected volunteers who may already be at lower risk of Covid mortality due to their healthier lifestyle. Nevertheless, the data is very encouraging!

Ultimately, the decision to get a second booster, particularly during non-surge periods, will depend a lot on not only available facts but the individual’s threshold for acceptable risk of even mild disease, concern over transmission to others and more recently the cost of the vaccine, among other factors.  

Bonus Pearl: Did you know that each year there are plenty of uncertainties around which influenza A or B subtypes will be the predominant seasonal strain or what month they may surge but these questions never keep us from recommending the annual flu vaccine to the public as a means of reducing influenza cases and saving lives?   

 

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References

  1. D.A. Allows Second Covid Boosters for Everyone 50 and Older – The New York Times (nytimes.com)
  2. Coronavirus (COVID-19) Update: FDA Authorizes Second Booster Dose of Two COVID-19 Vaccines for Older and Immunocompromised Individuals | FDA
  3. CDC Recommends Additional Boosters for Certain Individuals | CDC Online Newsroom | CDC
  4. Arbel R, Sergienko R, Friger M, et al. Second booster vaccine and Covid-19 mortality in adults 60-100 years old. Preprint, posted March 24, 2022. 24514bba-2c9d-4add-9d8f-321f610ed199.pdf (researchsquare.com)

Disclosures: The listed questions and answers are solely the responsibility of the author and do not necessarily represent the official views of Mercy Hospital-St. Louis, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Catalyst, Harvard University, their affiliate academic healthcare centers, or its contributors. Although every effort has been made to provide accurate information, the author is far from being perfect. The reader is urged to verify the content of the material with other sources as deemed appropriate and exercise clinical judgment in the interpretation and application of the information provided herein. No responsibility for an adverse outcome or guarantees for a favorable clinical result is assumed by the author. Thank you!

 

What’s the latest on second Covid vaccine boosters and should I recommend them to my adult patients?

Should healthy adults receive a Covid vaccine booster shot and why?

A booster shot of Covid vaccine (eg, mRNA, Pfizer or Moderna) is now recommended by the CDC even for healthy adults as follows:1

  • If you received Pfizer vaccine as your primary series, are ≥12 years old and at least 5 months after your 2nd dose
  • If you received Moderna vaccine as your primary series, are ≥18 years old and at least 5 months after your 2nd dose
  • If you received J&J vaccine, are ≥18 years old and at least 2 months after your 1st dose

There are at least 3 reasons for receiving a Covid vaccine booster: 1

  • Waning immunity after primary vaccine series
  • Emergence of Omicron variant which seems to be less responsive to the existing immunity from the vaccine
  • Recent data from clinical trials showing that a booster shot increased the immune response in trial participants who completed an either Pfizer or Moderna mRNA vaccine primary series 6 months earlier or had J&J vaccine single dose 2 months earlier

Here is the data from CDC on the vaccine effectiveness against Covid based on epidemiologic data on emergency department (ED)/urgent care (UC) encounters or hospitalization during the recent Omicron-predominant period:2

 Vaccine effectiveness against ED/Urgent care encounters 

  • 2 doses of mRNA vaccine: 41% (69% <2 months vs 37% ≥5 months after last dose)
  • 3 doses of mRNA vaccine: 83% (87% < 2 months vs 66% 4 months vs 31% ≥5 months)

Vaccine effectiveness against hospitalization 

  • 2 doses of mRNA vaccine: 55% (71% < 2months vs 54% ≥5 months)
  • 3 doses of mRNA overall 88% (91% if < 2 months, 78% if ≥4 months)

So take full advantage of available Covid vaccines and maximize your chance of not getting Covid!

 

Bonus Pearl: Did you know that a recent CDC study found that people 18 years and older who received the same mRNA vaccine brand for all their vaccinations experienced fewer adverse reactions following the booster dose than they did after their second dose of mRNA vaccine, with 92% of reported reactions not considered serious?3

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References

  1. Covid-19 vaccine booster shots. Feb 2, 2022. https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/booster-shot.html#:~:text=It%20depends.,after%20the%20J%26J%2FJanssen%20vaccine. Accessed Feb 24, 2022
  2. Waning 2-dose and 3-dose effectiveness of mRNA vaccines against Covid-19-associated emergency department and urgent care encounters and hospitalizations among adults during periods of delta and omicron variant predominance-VISION network, 110 states, August 2021-Jan 2022. Feb 18, 2022 https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/71/wr/mm7107e2.htm#T1_down. Accessed Feb 24, 2022.
  3. New CDC studies: Covid-19 boosters remains safe, continue to offer high levels of protection against severe disease over time and during Omicron and delta waves. Feb 11, 2022. https://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2022/s0211-covid-19-boosters.html. Accessed Feb 24, 2022

 

Disclosures: The listed questions and answers are solely the responsibility of the author and do not necessarily represent the official views of Mercy Hospital-St. Louis, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Catalyst, Harvard University, their affiliate academic healthcare centers, or its contributors. Although every effort has been made to provide accurate information, the author is far from being perfect. The reader is urged to verify the content of the material with other sources as deemed appropriate and exercise clinical judgment in the interpretation and application of the information provided herein. No responsibility for an adverse outcome or guarantees for a favorable clinical result is assumed by the author. Thank you!

Should healthy adults receive a Covid vaccine booster shot and why?

What’s the evidence that a third dose of mRNA Covid-19 vaccine reduces risk of Covid-19 disease?

The strongest evidence to date demonstrating the effectiveness of a third dose of mRNA Covid-19 vaccine comes from an observational study from Israel which reported 93% effectiveness for admission to hospital, 92% for severe disease and 81% for Covid-19 related deaths when compared to those who had received 2 doses of the vaccine (Pfizer, BNT162b2 mRNA) at least 5 months before.1

This was a large population-based study involving over a million people 16 years or older (one-half in each group) who were eligible for the third dose (median age 52 y); those living in long-term facilities, healthcare workers and those medically confined to their homes were excluded. Vaccine effectiveness was evaluated at least 7 days after receipt of the third dose.  Median follow-up period was 13 days for both groups.

Overall effectiveness of the third dose vs 2 vaccine doses was 93% (88-97) for admission to hospital, 92% (82-97) for severe disease and 81% for death (59-97). Effectiveness of the third dose was similar between males and females and between individuals 40-60 years and those at least 70 years of age; effectiveness could not be determined in the younger age group due to small number of adverse outcomes.

What makes this study stand out among the previous works2,3 is that it controlled for important possible confounders, including sociodemographic factors, clinical factors, and behavioral factors related to Covid-19.  Limitations include its observational nature and exclusion of certain at risk groups, such as nursing home residents and healthcare workers.

Given the increasing number of Covid-19 cases in many communities at this writing, the news that a booster shot of an mRNA vaccine provides further protection in preventing Covid-19 is very welcome!

Bonus Pearl: Did you know that in a study measuring the immune response after the third dose of an mRNA vaccine (Moderna) in those 60 years of age or older, the median antibody titer rose 50-fold!4

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References

  1. Barda N, Dagan N, Cohen C, et al. Effectiveness of a third dose of the BNT162b2 mRNA Covid-19 vaccine for preventing severe outcomes in Israel: an observational study. Lancet, published online October 29, 2021. https://www.thelancet.com/action/showPdf?pii=S0140-6736%2821%2902249-2
  2. Bar-On YM, Goldberg Y, Mandel M, et al. Protection of BNT162b2 vaccine.N Engl J Med 2021; published online Sept 15, https://doi.org/10.1056/nejmoa21114255.
  3. Patalon T, Gazit S, Pitzer VE, et al. Short term reduction in the odds of testing positive for SARS-CoV-2; a comparison between two doses and three doses of the BNT162b2 vaccine. medRxive 2021;published online Aug 31. https://doi.org/10.1101/2021.008.29.21262792 (preprint).
  4.  Eliakim-Raz N, Liebovici-Weisman Y, Stemmer A, et al. Antibody titers before and aftera third dose of SARS-CoV-2 BNT162b2 vaccine in adults ages ≥60 years. JAMA. Published online November 5, 2021. doi:10.1001/jama.2021.19885 https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/2786096

Disclosures: The listed questions and answers are solely the responsibility of the author and do not necessarily represent the official views of Mercy Hospital-St. Louis, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Catalyst, Harvard University, their affiliate academic healthcare centers, or its contributors. Although every effort has been made to provide accurate information, the author is far from being perfect. The reader is urged to verify the content of the material with other sources as deemed appropriate and exercise clinical judgment in the interpretation and application of the information provided herein. No responsibility for an adverse outcome or guarantees for a favorable clinical result is assumed by the author. Thank you!

What’s the evidence that a third dose of mRNA Covid-19 vaccine reduces risk of Covid-19 disease?

What’s the evidence that immunocompromised patients need a 3rd booster mRNA Covid vaccine shot?

At this time, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommendation for a booster shot of an mRNA vaccine in patients with moderate to severe immunocompromised state (1,2) is based primarily on the concern for waning immunity following the initial series—including a decline in neutralizing antibodies— in this patient population, and the finding that at least some immunocompromised patients may have a significant improvement in certain laboratory measurements of immunity following their booster shot. 

Although there are no randomized-controlled trials of the efficacy of the 3rd shot in protecting against Covid-19 in immunocompromised patients, the recent surge in the highly transmissible SARS-CoV-2 variants in many parts of the world (including the U.S.)  as well as immunocompromised patient population accounting for nearly one-half of all breakthrough Covid-19 cases requiring hospitalization (1) make it urgent to adopt these recommendations. 

A randomized trial involving 120 solid organ transplant patients (median age 67 y) found higher neutralizing antibody levels and SARS CoV-2 specific T-cell counts after the mRNA-1273 (Moderna) vaccine booster dose compared to placebo (3).

In another study involving 101 solid organ transplant patients, of 59 subjects who were seronegative before the 3rd dose, 44% became seropositive 4 weeks after the 3rd vaccine dose ( BNT162b2-Pfizer vaccine administered 2 months after the second dose). Patients who did not have an antibody response were older, had higher degree of immunosuppression and had a lower estimated glomerular filtration rate than those with antibody response (4).

A “spectacular increase” in anti-spike antibodies with levels close to the general population has also been reported among hemodialysis patients receiving a third dose of Pfizer mRNA vaccine (5). 

Until further data from larger studies become available,  these studies support administration of a 3rd dose booster mRNA vaccine in moderate to severely immunosuppressed individuals.

Bonus Pearl: Did you know that although immunocompromised patients have significantly worse influenza outcome, the data on the impact of immunocompromised status on the outcome of Covid-19 is less clear with published evidence that both supports and refutes this association (6)?  

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References

  1. CDC. Data and clinical considerations for additional doses in immunocompromised people: ACIP Meeting, July 22, 2021. ACIP Data and Clinical Considerations for Additional Doses in Immunocompromised People (cdc.gov)
  2. CDC. Interim clinical considerations for use of Covid-19 vaccines currently authorized in the United States. August 13, 2021. Interim Clinical Considerations for Use of COVID-19 Vaccines | CDC
  3. Hall VG, Ferreira VH, Ku T, et al. Randomized trial of a third dose of mRNA-1273 vaccine recipients. N Engl J Med 2021, Aug 11. Randomized Trial of a Third Dose of mRNA-1273 Vaccine in Transplant Recipients | NEJM
  4. Kamar N, Abravanel F, Marion O. Three doses of an mRNA Covid-19 vaccine in solid-organ transplant recipient. N Engl J Med 2021, Aug 12.Three Doses of an mRNA Covid-19 Vaccine in Solid-Organ Transplant Recipients | NEJM
  5. Frantzen L, Thibeaut S, Moussi-Frances J, et al. Covid-19 vaccination in haemodialysis patients: Good things come in threes… Neph Dial Transplant, 20 July 2023. COVID-19 Vaccination in Haemodialysis Patients: Good things come in threes… – PubMed (nih.gov)
  6. Parisi C. An opportunity to better understand the impact of coronavirus on immunocompromised patients. J Infect Dis 2021;224:372-3. Opportunity to Better Understand the Impact of Coronaviruses on Immunocompromised Patients | The Journal of Infectious Diseases | Oxford Academic (oup.com)

Disclosures: The listed questions and answers are solely the responsibility of the author and do not necessarily represent the official views of Mercy-St. Louis, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Catalyst, Harvard University, their affiliate healthcare centers, or its contributors. Although every effort has been made to provide accurate information, the author is far from being perfect. The reader is urged to verify the content of the material with other sources as deemed appropriate and exercise clinical judgment in the interpretation and application of the information provided herein. No responsibility for an adverse outcome or guarantees for a favorable clinical result is assumed by the author. Thank you!

What’s the evidence that immunocompromised patients need a 3rd booster mRNA Covid vaccine shot?

What’s the effectiveness of Covid-19 vaccination in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) treated with high-efficacy disease-modifying therapies?

The answer appears to be dependent on which high-efficacy disease-modifying agent is being used to treat MS.  Limited data suggest that cladribine treatment does not impair humoral response to Covid-19 vaccine in patients with MS, while ocrelizumab and fingolimod have a major negative impact on vaccine responsiveness based on humoral antibody measurements.1

A study involving 125 Covid-19 MS vaccine (mRNA, Pfizer BNT162b2) recipients  (58% females, 61% relapse-remitting, 19% primary-progressive, 14% secondary-progressive, 3% clinically isolated syndrome and 2% radiologically isolated syndrome), found high levels of SARS-CoV-2 anti-spike IgG in all subjects (n=23) receiving cladribine as early as 4.4 months from last treatment dose.1

In contrast only 4% of patients with MS treated with fingolimod had a post-vaccination humoral response (time-interval from last treatment dose to vaccination not reported).  Similarly, most patients under treatment with ocrelizumab failed to develop a post-vaccination humoral response, with only 23% demonstrating a protective antibody titer (time-interval from last treatment dose 3.1-8.9 months).

These results may not be totally surprising given the attenuated humoral response to several common vaccines in patients with MS treated with ocrelizumab or fingolimod.2,3

Given the potential suboptimal response to Covid-19 vaccine in patients with MS treated with fingolimod or ocrelizumab, until further data become available, it’s fair to state that patients treated with these agents should NOT depend on vaccination to protect them from Covid-19 and that they may need to still take extra precautions during the pandemic.   

 

Bonus Pearl: Did you know that fingolimod prevents lymphocyte egression from secondary lymphoid tissue and ocrelizumab is an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody that depletes B lymphocytes?1

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Reference

  1. Achiron A, Mandel M, Dreyer-Alster S, et al. Humoral immune response to COVID-19 mRNA vaccine in patients with multiple sclerosis treated with high-efficacy disease-modifying therapies. Therapeutic Adances in Neurological Disorders 2021;14:1-8. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/17562864211012835
  2. Bar-Or A, Calkwood JC, Chognot C, et al. Effect of ocrelizumab on vaccine responses in patients with multiple sclerosis. Neurology 2020; 95:e1999-22008. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32727835/
  3. Kappos L, Mehling M, Arroyo R, et al. Randomized trial of vaccination in fingolimod-treated patients with multiple sclerosis. Neurology 2015;84:872-9. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25636714/  

Disclosures: The listed questions and answers are solely the responsibility of the author and do not necessarily represent the official views of Mercy Hospital-St. Louis or its affiliate healthcare centers, Mass General Hospital, Harvard Medical School or its affiliated institutions. Although every effort has been made to provide accurate information, the author is far from being perfect. The reader is urged to verify the content of the material with other sources as deemed appropriate and exercise clinical judgment in the interpretation and application of the information provided herein. No responsibility for an adverse outcome or guarantees for a favorable clinical result is assumed by the author. Thank you!

What’s the effectiveness of Covid-19 vaccination in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) treated with high-efficacy disease-modifying therapies?

How effective are the mRNA Covid-19 vaccines in reducing the risk of hospitalization among adults 65 years of age or older?

The mRNA vaccines by Pfizer and Moderna seem very effective in not only reducing risk of symptomatic Covid-19 but also risk of hospitalization among adults 65 years of age or older.   A CDC study published on April 28, 2021, showed a vaccine efficacy of 94% among fully immunized and 64% among partially immunized adults ≥ 65 years of age  with approximately one-half of subjects  ≥75 years old.1

This study was carried out in 24 hospitals in 14 states in the U.S. during January 1, 2021-March 26, 2021, and involved 417 patients: 187 case-patients with Covid-19 and 230 controls with negative SARS-CoV-2 PCR test.  Among patients with Covid-19, 10% were partially immunized (vs 27% among controls) and 0.5% were fully immunized (vs. 8% among controls). 1

An Israeli study in a nationwide mass vaccination setting involving persons (28% ≥ 60 y) receiving Pfizer mRNA vaccine similarly found a vaccine efficacy of 74% for hospitalization for partially immunized and 87% for fully immunized persons.2

The high effectiveness of mRNA vaccines against more severe Covid-19 requiring hospitalization is great news, of course, as advanced age is by far the greatest risk factor for death from Covid-19, independent of underlying comorbidities.3   

Bonus Pearl: Did you know that prior to the availability of effective Covid-19 vaccination, adults over 65 years of age represented 80% of hospitalizations and had a 23-fold greater risk of death than those under 65?3

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References

  1. Tenforde MW, Olson SM, Self WH, et al. Effectiveness of Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines against COVID-19 among hospitalized adults aged ≥65 years-United States, January-March 2021. https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/70/wr/mm7018e1.htm?s_cid=mm7018e1_w
  2. Dagan N, Barda N, Kepten E, et al. BNT162b2mRNA Covid-19 vaccine in a nationwide mass vaccination setting. N Engl J Med 2021;384:1412-1423. https://www.nejm.org/doi/10.1056/NEJMoa2101765
  3. Mueller AL, McNamara MS, Sinclair DA. Why does COVID-19 disproportionately affect older people. Aging (Albany NY) 2020;12:9959-9981. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7288963/

Disclosures: The listed questions and answers are solely the responsibility of the author and do not necessarily represent the official views of Mercy Hospital-St. Louis or its affiliate healthcare centers, Mass General Hospital, Harvard Medical School or its affiliated institutions. Although every effort has been made to provide accurate information, the author is far from being perfect. The reader is urged to verify the content of the material with other sources as deemed appropriate and exercise clinical judgment in the interpretation and application of the information provided herein. No responsibility for an adverse outcome or guarantees for a favorable clinical result is assumed by the author. Thank you!

How effective are the mRNA Covid-19 vaccines in reducing the risk of hospitalization among adults 65 years of age or older?

Are women at higher risk of Covid-19 vaccine-related adverse events?

Data to date shows a preponderance of Covid-19 vaccine-related adverse events (AEs) among women compared to men. This finding may be due to the generally more robust immunological response to infections and vaccines among women, increased reporting of AEs by women, genetic factors, microbiome differences as well as other factors.1-3

A CDC study involving mRNA vaccines (Pfizer and Moderna) during the 1st month of vaccination roll out in the US, found that nearly 80% of adverse events were reported by women.  The great majority (>90%) of these AEs were not serious and included symptoms such as headache, dizziness and fatigue.1

A JAMA study involving individuals receiving one of the mRNA vaccines found that 94% (Pfizer) and 100% (Moderna) of anaphylaxis events occurred among women. Of note, the median age was ~40 years  with the majority of anaphylaxis events were reported after the first dose. 2

Higher incidence of AEs following Covid-19 vaccination is not surprising and may be explained biologically. Women typically have a more robust immune response to infections and vaccination, both at the level of innate and adaptive immunity with higher antibody responses.  

These findings may be in part due to hormones such as estrogen which is known to enhance differentiation of dendritic cells and proinflammatory cytokine production. Other proposed mechanisms include differences in microbiome between sexes and sex-based genetic influences on humoral immune profile with the X chromosome expressing 10 times more genes than the Y chromosome, including genes that influence immunity.3

Bonus Pearl: Did you know that anaphylactic reaction to the mRNA Covid-19 vaccines is extremely rare, occurring in only 2-5 cases/ million!2

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References

  1. Gee J, Marquez P, Su J, et al. First month of Covid-19 vaccine safety monitoring—United States, December 14, 2020—January 13, 2021. MMWR 2021;70:283-88. https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/70/wr/mm7008e3.htm
  2. Shimabukuro TT, Cole M, Su JR. Reports of anaphylaxis after receipt of mRNA Covid-19 vaccines in the US—December 14, 2020-January 18, 2021. JAMA 20201;325:1101-1102. https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/2776557
  3. Fischinger S, Boudreau CM, Butler AL, et al. Sex differences in vaccine-induced humoral immunity. Semin Immunopath 2019;41:239-49. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30547182/

Disclosures: The listed questions and answers are solely the responsibility of the author and do not necessarily represent the official views of Mercy Hospital-St. Louis or its affiliate healthcare centers, Mass General Hospital, Harvard Medical School or its affiliated institutions. Although every effort has been made to provide accurate information, the author is far from being perfect. The reader is urged to verify the content of the material with other sources as deemed appropriate and exercise clinical judgment in the interpretation and application of the information provided herein. No responsibility for an adverse outcome or guarantees for a favorable clinical result is assumed by the author. Thank you!

Are women at higher risk of Covid-19 vaccine-related adverse events?

How effective are the current Covid-19 vaccines in reducing the risk of asymptomatic infection?

Limited data suggest that not only are the mRNA Covid-19 vaccines effective in reducing the risk of symptomatic disease  by greater than 90% but also reducing the risk of asymptomatic infections by 80-90% after the second dose and by 62-80% after the 1st dose. 1-3

A CDC study of health care personnel, first responders, and other essential and frontline workers who received one of the 2 currently available mRNA vaccines (BNT162b2-Pfizer or mRNA-1273-Moderna) and underwent weekly testing for SARS-CoV-2 infection irrespective of symptoms found 90% efficacy in preventing infection among fully immunized (≥14 days after 2nd dose) and 80% efficacy in preventing infection among the partially immunized (≥14 days after 1st dose).  The majority of SARS-CoV-2 infections were identified by weekly specimens, with 11% remaining without symptoms.1

In a retrospective study of over 39,000 asymptomatic adult patients undergoing pre-procedural SARS-CoV-2 molecular screening tests, an 80% reduction in the risk of a positive test  was observed in those who had received 2 doses of an mRNA vaccine (majority Pfizer) and 72% reduction in those following a single dose of vaccine >10 days prior to their pre-procedure test.2  In the original Moderna trial , a 62% reduction in the risk of asymptomatic infection was seen among participants just before the second dose (ie, partially immunized).3 

Collectively, these reports support the high efficacy of mRNA vaccines in reducing the risk of SARS-CoV-2 in asymptomatic infection.  Whether these findings can be reproduced with other vaccine preparations is not known at this time!

Bonus Pearl: Did you know that according to 1 study, asymptomatic patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection may be more likely to be women, younger and have shorter duration of viral shedding? 4

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References

  1. Thompson MG, Burgess JL, Naleway AL, et al. Interim estimates of vaccine effectiveness of BNT162b2 and mRNA-1273 Covid-19 vaccines in preventing SARS-CoV-2 infection among health care personnel, first responders, and other essential and frontline workers—Eight U.S. locations, December 2020-March 2021. https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/70/wr/mm7013e3.htm
  2. Tande AJ, Pollock BD, Shah ND, et al. Impact of the Covid-19 vaccine on asymptomatic infection among patients undergoing pre-procedural Covid-19 molecular screening. Clin Infect Dis 2021. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33704435/
  3. Baden LR, El Sahly HM, Essink B, et al. Efficacy and safety of the mRNA-1273 SARS-CoV-2 vaccine. N Engl J Med 2021;384:403-16. https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/nejmoa2035389
  4. Yang R, Gui X, Xiong Y. Comparison of clinical characteristics of patients with asymptomatic vs symptomatic coronavirus disease 2019 in Wuhan, China. JAMA Network Open 2020; May 27. https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamanetworkopen/fullarticle/2766237

Disclosures: The listed questions and answers are solely the responsibility of the author and do not necessarily represent the official views of Mercy Hospital-St. Louis or its affiliate healthcare centers, Mass General Hospital, Harvard Medical School or its affiliated institutions. Although every effort has been made to provide accurate information, the author is far from being perfect. The reader is urged to verify the content of the material with other sources as deemed appropriate and exercise clinical judgment in the interpretation and application of the information provided herein. No responsibility for an adverse outcome or guarantees for a favorable clinical result is assumed by the author. Thank you!

How effective are the current Covid-19 vaccines in reducing the risk of asymptomatic infection?