What’s the evidence that REGEN-COV (casirivimab and imdevimab) monoclonal antibody cocktail is effective in the post-exposure prophylaxis of Covid-19?

The U.S. FDA has issued an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) for the emergency use of REGEN-COV in adult and pediatric populations (≥12 years of age and older weighing> 40 kg) who are at high risk* of progression to severe COVID-19— including hospitalization or death— and who are not fully vaccinated or are not expected to mount an adequate immune response to the vaccine (eg, immunocompromised state).1  This recommendation is based on a randomized controlled trial involving individuals enrolled within 96 hours of exposure to a known Covid-19 case (Covid-10 Phase 3 Prevention Trial).2

In this trial, the primary efficacy end point was the development of symptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infection through day 28  in participants who did not have SARS-CoV-2 infection  by PCR or serology at the time of enrollment. Symptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infection developed in 1.5% of treatment group (vs 7.8% in placebo group) with 81.4% relative risk reduction (P<0.001); 66% reduction was observed when symptomatic and asymptomatic infections were combined.  Duration of symptoms and the magnitude and duration of detectable RNA were also lower in the REGEN-COV group compared to placebo. Therapy was well tolerated.2

In the same study, in a subgroup analysis of those who were seropositive at the time of enrollment REGEN-COV lowered the risk of symptomatic disease (0.4% vs 2.3% in the placebo group) with relative risk reduction of 81%, though not statistically significant (P=0.14).  This may be why the FDA EUA extended to certain vaccinated groups as well since to date there are no published trials on the use of REGEN-COV as post-exposure prophylaxis in vaccinated individuals.

*High risk group included ≥65 years of age, BMI≥25 kg/m2, diabetes, immunocompromised state, cardiovascular disease or hypertension, chronic lung disease, sickle cell disease and neurodevelopment disorders.

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References

  1. Fact sheet for health care providers emergency use authorization (EUA) of REGEN-COV. https://www.fda.gov/media/145611/download. Accessed September 15, 2021.
  2. O’Brien MP. Forleo-Neto E, Musser BJ et al. Subcutaneous REGEN-COV antibody combination to prevent Covid-19. N Engl J Med 2021, August 4, 2021. https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa2109682

 

Disclosures: The listed questions and answers are solely the responsibility of the author and do not necessarily represent the official views of Mercy Hospital-St. Louis, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Catalyst, Harvard University, their affiliate academic healthcare centers, or its contributors. Although every effort has been made to provide accurate information, the author is far from being perfect. The reader is urged to verify the content of the material with other sources as deemed appropriate and exercise clinical judgment in the interpretation and application of the information provided herein. No responsibility for an adverse outcome or guarantees for a favorable clinical result is assumed by the author. Thank you!

What’s the evidence that REGEN-COV (casirivimab and imdevimab) monoclonal antibody cocktail is effective in the post-exposure prophylaxis of Covid-19?

Should patients previously immunized against Covid-19 receive selected monoclonal antibodies when diagnosed with a breakthrough infection?

Although published studies supporting monoclonal antibody therapy in mild to moderate Covid-19 preceded availability of Covid-19 vaccines and the emergence of new variants of concern,1,2 given the possibility of severe breakthrough Covid-19 in high risk vaccinated patients with suboptimal immunity and the retained activity of certain monoclonal antibody products (ie, casirivimab and imdevimab-Regeneron-Cov and sotrovimab) against common variants of SARS-CoV-2 , their use is recommended even in vaccinated individuals with mild to moderate Covid-19.3-5

In fact, the CDC states that “For people who have received one or more doses of Covid-19 vaccine and subsequently experience SARS-CoV-2 infection, prior receipt of a Covid-19 vaccine should not affect treatment decisions (including use of monoclonal antibodies, convalescent plasma, antiviral treatment, or corticosteroid administration) or timing of such treatment.”3

In its July 30, 2021 Emergency Authorization Use (EUA) letter regarding use of casirivimab and imdevimab – REGEN-COV), the FDA does not distinguish between vaccinated and unvaccinated individuals for its indications,4 similar to those of guidelines posted by the Department of Health and Human Services and the NIH.5-6

When indicated, high risk vaccinated individuals with Covid-19 should be offered  an FDA approved (under EUA currently) monoclonal antibody product (such as  casirivimab and imdevimab antibody cocktail or sotrovimab) soon after diagnosis and certainly no later than 10 days.

Vaccinated individuals with mild to moderate Covid-19 not requiring hospitalization and for whom monoclonal antibody treatment may be indicated include older patients and those with risk factors for severe disease, such as obesity, pregnancy, chronic kidney disease, chronic lung disease (including COPD), immunocompromised state, serious heart conditions (eg, heart failure, coronary artery disease, cardiomyopathies), sickle cell disease and type 2 diabetes.7

Of note, casirivimab and imdevimab is indicated for adults (weighing at least 40 kg) and children 12 years or older and is administered by IV infusion or subcutaneously, if IV infusion is not feasible and would lead to delay in treatment.4

Bonus Pearl: Did you know that in phase III trials, casirivimab and imdevimab  antibody cocktail reduced hospitalization or death by 70% in non-hospitalized patients with Covid-19?2

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References

  1. Interim clinical considerations for use of Covid-19 vaccines currently authorized in the United States. 2021. Available at https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/covid-19/info-by-product/clinical-considerations.html. Accessed August 22, 2021.
  2. March 23, 2021 https://www.roche.com/media/releases/med-cor-2021-03-23.htm
  3. Dougan M, Nirula A, Azizad M, et al. Bamlanivimab plus Etesevimab in mild or moderate Covid-19. N Engl J Med, July 14, 2021. https://www.nejm.org/doi/10.1056/NEJMoa2102685
  4. Letter, EUA REGEN-COV, July 30, 2021. https://www.fda.gov/media/145610/download
  5. Department of Health and Human Services. High risk Covid-19 outpatients may avoid hospitalization with monoclonal antibody treatment. July 16, 2021. https://combatcovid.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/documents/High-Risk-COVID-19-Outpatients-072021.pdf
  6. Anti-SARS Cov-2 monoclonal antibodies. Accessed August 22, 2021. https://www.covid19treatmentguidelines.nih.gov/therapies/anti-sars-cov-2-antibody-products/anti-sars-cov-2-monoclonal-antibodies/
  7. Science brief: evidence used to update the list of underlying medical conditions that increase a person’s risk of severe illness from Covid-19. Accessed August 22, 2021. https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/science/science-briefs/underlying-evidence-table.html

Disclosures: The listed questions and answers are solely the responsibility of the author and do not necessarily represent the official views of Mercy-St. Louis, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Catalyst, Harvard University, their affiliate healthcare centers, or its contributors. Although every effort has been made to provide accurate information, the author is far from being perfect. The reader is urged to verify the content of the material with other sources as deemed appropriate and exercise clinical judgment in the interpretation and application of the information provided herein. No responsibility for an adverse outcome or guarantees for a favorable clinical result is assumed by the author. Thank you!

Should patients previously immunized against Covid-19 receive selected monoclonal antibodies when diagnosed with a breakthrough infection?

Why might convalescent sera or plasma transfusion therapy be effective in the treatment of patients with Covid-19?

Of the myriad therapeutic approaches currently under consideration in our fight against Covid-19, convalescent sera/plasma therapy (CSPT) is particularly promising. The principle behind CSPT is to provide immediate immunity to susceptible people by administering the serum or plasma—therefore antibodies—of individuals who have successfully recovered from Covid-19.1

The theory behind using antibody-containing blood products to treat infections is by no means new and goes back to the 1890s when serum from exposed animals who recovered from disease was used to protect healthy animals against tetanus and diphtheria.2

Historically, CSPT has been used against poliomyelitis, measles, mumps, and influenza, and more recently in a smaller number of patients with SARS, H5N1 and H7N9 avian influenza and Ebola.1,3-8 A 2015 systematic review and exploratory meta-analysis of 32 studies involving severe acute respiratory infections of viral etiology (including influenza and SARS) found a reduction in mortality (odds ratio, 0.25, 95% C.I. 0.14-0.45), particularly when CSPT was administered early into the illness.3

Experience with 1918 Spanish influenza pandemic: A meta-analysis of 1703 hospitalized patients (Yes, scientists performed wonderful studies back then too despite a pandemic!) during the 1918 Spanish influenza pandemic demonstrated decreased mortality with administration of convalescent blood products with crude case-fatality rates dropping by one-half (16% vs 37% in controls)! Notably, patients who were treated within 4 days of pneumonia had one-third the case-fatality rate compared to those treated later.3

Experience with 2002-2004 SARS epidemic: A retrospective study from Hong Kong involving 80 patients with SARS (caused by another coronavirus, SARS-CoV-1) not responding to antibiotics/steroids/interferon but receiving CSPT reported a lower mortality rate with near significant (P=0.08) improvement in outcome and reduced mortality in the group that received CSPT before day 14 of the illness (6.3% vs 21.9%).4

What about Covid-19? A very preliminary report out of China involving 5 mechanically-ventilated patients with ARDS and rapid progression despite corticosteroids and antivirals found clinical improvement in all 5 patients. More specifically, body temperature normalized within 3 days in 4 of 5 patients and ARDS resolved in 4 patients at 12 days following transfusion, 2 patients were in stable condition and 3 patients were eventually discharged from the hospital.9

Of course, we should be mindful of potential adverse reactions due to CSP as well, such as allergic reactions, infections, transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI), and theoretical risk of antibody-dependent enhancement of infection (ADE).1 Only properly designed clinical studies can shed light on the safety and efficacy of CSPT in Covid-19.

Nevertheless, the historical data on the use of CSPT in serious viral infections is encouraging. In fact, the first US studies of CSPT in Covid-19 have already been approved by the FDA!10 Stay tuned!

Bonus pearl: Did you know that serum and plasma both refer to the noncellular fluid part of blood, but serum is collected after coagulation factors (fibrinogen) have been removed. Fortunately, both contain antibodies!

 

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Contributed by Bruce Tiu, Harvard Medical Student, Boston, MA.

References:

  1. Casadevall A, Pirofski L. The convalescent sera for containing COVID-19. J Clin Invest. 2020;130(4):1545-1548. doi: 10.1172/JCI138003 https://www.jci.org/articles/view/138003
  2. Eibl MM. History of immunoglobulin replacement. Immunol Allergy Clin North Am. 2008;28(4):737–viii. doi:10.1016/j.iac.2008.06.004 https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0889856108000702
  3. Mair-Jenkins J, Saavedra-Campos M, Baillie K, et al. The effectiveness of convalescent plasma and hyperimmune immunoglobulin for the treatment of severe acute respiratory infections of viral etiology: A systematic review and exploratory meta-analysis. J Infect Dis 2015; 211: 80-90. https://academic.oup.com/jid/article/211/1/80/799341
  4. Luke TC, Kilbane EM, Jackson JL, et al. Meta-Analysis: Convalescent Blood Products for Spanish Influenza Pneumonia: A Future H5N1 Treatment?. Ann Intern Med. 2006;145:599–609. doi: 10.7326/0003-4819-145-8-200610170-00139 https://annals.org/aim/article-abstract/729754/meta-analysis-convalescent-blood-products-spanish-influenza-pneumonia-future-h5n1
  5. Cheng Y, Wong R, Soo YO, et al. Use of convalescent plasma therapy in SARS patients in Hong Kong. Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2005;24(1):44–46. doi:10.1007/s10096-004-1271-9 https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10096-004-1271-9
  6. Zhou B, Zhong N, Guan Y. Treatment with convalescent plasma for influenza A (H5N1) infection. N Engl J Med. 2007;357:1450–1. doi: 10.1056/NEJMc070359 https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMc070359
  7. Chen L, Xiong J, Bao L, et al. Convalescent plasma as a potential therapy for COVID-19. Lancet Infect Dis 2020;20: 398-400. https://www.thelancet.com/journals/laninf/article/PIIS1473-3099(20)30141-9/fulltext
  8. Wu XX, Gao HN, Wu HB, Peng XM, Ou HL, Li LJ. Successful treatment of avian-origin influenza A (H7N9) infection using convalescent plasma. Int J Infect Dis. 2015;41:3–5. doi: 10.1016/j.ijid.2015.10.009 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26482389
  9. Shen C, Wang Z, Zhao F, et al. Treatment of 5 Critically Ill Patients With COVID-19 With Convalescent Plasma. JAMA. Published online March 27, 2020. doi:10.1001/jama.2020.4783 https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/2763983
  10. https://thehill.com/regulation/healthcare/490768-first-us-coronavirus-patients-being-treated-with-plasma-therapy.

Disclosures: The listed questions and answers are solely the responsibility of the author and do not necessarily represent the official views of Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Catalyst, Harvard University, its affiliate academic healthcare centers, or its contributors. Although every effort has been made to provide accurate information, the author is far from being perfect. The reader is urged to verify the content of the material with other sources as deemed appropriate and exercise clinical judgment in the interpretation and application of the information provided herein. No responsibility for an adverse outcome or guarantees for a favorable clinical result is assumed by the author. Thank you!

 

 

 

 

Why might convalescent sera or plasma transfusion therapy be effective in the treatment of patients with Covid-19?

Is there a connection between trehalose, a natural sugar found in many foods, and Clostridioides difficile disease (CDD)?

There is experimental and epidemiological evidence that trehalose in the diet may enhance the virulence of the epidemic strains (eg. Ribotype 027) of C. difficile (1). 
Many of us may not be familiar with trehalose. It’s a disaccharide composed of 2 glucose molecules and found widely in nature, including bacteria, fungi (eg mushrooms, Brewer’s yeast), plants, insects, other invertebrates, but not vertebrates (2).

Since its approval by the FDA as a natural food additive in 2000, trehalose is increasingly used for its unique properties (including flavor enhancer and moisture stabilizer) in a variety of foods, including ice cream, pasta, ground beef, and sushi. Although in humans trehalose is enzymatically broken down to glucose by the brush borders of intestinal mucosa, intact trehalose is also found in the lower GI tract where C. difficile thrives.
In a series of intriguing experiments involving the interaction between trehulose and C. difficile published in Nature in 2018, Collins et al found that RT027 strain of C. difficile had acquired unique mechanisms to metabolize low concentrations of trehalose and that dietary trehalose increased its virulence associated with high mortality in a mouse model of infection even in the absence of antibiotic exposure. They further demonstrated that when human diet was simulated (eg, at concentrations suggested in ice cream), trehalose levels in the cecum of the mice were sufficient to induce production of the enzyme phosphotrehalase by the same strain in vitro by over 400X in the absence of antibiotics and by over 1000X in the presence of antibiotics. Similar results were found in the ileostomy fluid samples of 2 of 3 volunteers consuming normal diet (1). 
Equally fascinating is the epidemiological evidence that the timelines of trehalose adoption as a food additive in 2000, subsequent uptick in the number CDDs in the US, as well as the spread of RT027 strain in many countries seem to overlap (1).

 
These observations may at least partially explain the frequently severe nature of CDD during the past 2 decades as well why a significant proportion (up to a-third) of patient with CDD appear to have no recent exposure to antibiotics or hospitalization (3-5).  An epidemiological study examining the dietary habits of patients with CDD without apparent risk factors is in order. Stay tuned!
Bonus Pearl: Did you know that trehalose is classified as “generally regarded as safe” (GRAS)  natural food additive by the FDA and may be listed as “added sugar” or “natural flavor” on the food packaging?

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References
1. Collins J, Robinson C, Danhof H, et al. Dietary trehalose enhances virulence of epidemic Clostridium difficile. Nature 2018;553;291-96. https://www.nature.com/articles/nature25178
2. Avonce N, Mendoza-Vargas A, Morett E, et al. Insights on the evolution of trehalose biosynthesis. BMC Evol Biol 2006;6:109. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1769515/
3. Wilcox MH, Mooney L, Bendall R, Settle CD et al. A case-control study of community-associated Clostridium difficile infection. J Antimicrob Chemother 2008;62:388-96. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/5419268_A_case-control_study_of_community-associated_Clostridium_difficile_infection
4. Severe Clostridium difficile-associated disease in populations previously at low risk. MMWR2005;54:1201-5. https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5447a1.htm
5. Halvorson SAC, Cedfeldt AS, Hunter AJ. Fulminant, non-antibiotic associated Clostridium difficile colitis following Salmonella gastroenteritis. J Gen Intern Med 2010;26:95-7.

Disclosures: The listed questions and answers are solely the responsibility of the author and do not necessarily represent the official views of Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Catalyst, Harvard University, its affiliate academic healthcare centers, or its contributors. Although every effort has been made to provide accurate information, the author is far from being perfect. The reader is urged to verify the content of the material with other sources as deemed appropriate and exercise clinical judgment in the interpretation and application of the information provided herein. No responsibility for an adverse outcome or guarantees for a favorable clinical result is assumed by the author. Thank you!

 

Is there a connection between trehalose, a natural sugar found in many foods, and Clostridioides difficile disease (CDD)?

My diabetic patient complains of new onset tingling, burning, and numbness in her feet and ankles while taking levofloxacin for sinusitis. Could it be the antibiotic?

Although there are numerous culprits in peripheral neuropathy (PN), fluoroquinolones (FQs) are increasing reported as a potential cause, affecting about 1% of patients. 1

Besides many case reports, couple of large epidemiologic studies support the association between PN and FQs. A case-control pharmacoepidemiologic study of a cohort of men aged 45-80 years without diabetes found that current users of FQs were nearly twice as likely to develop PN (RR 1.83, 95% C.I. 1.49-2.27), with the highest risk found among current new users of FQ.2 The risk appeared similar among the 3 most commonly used FQs (levofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, moxifloxacin).

Another epidemiologic study with “pharmacovigilance analysis” based on the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System found significant disproportionality of PN for FQs compared to many other antibiotics. 3 The median onset of PN after exposure to FQ was 4 days (range 0-91). Contrary to initial reports of the mild and reversible course of FQ-associated PN, 1 study reported that 58% of patients had symptoms lasting greater than 1 year.4`

These findings prompted the FDA to update its boxed warnings for FQs in 2016 to stress the potential rapidity of onset and permanence of FQ-associated PN while strongly discouraging their use in conditions for which alternative therapy exists, such as in acute bacterial sinusitis, acute bacterial exacerbation of chronic bronchitis and uncomplicated UTI.5

So while our patient may have other causes for her neurologic complaints, FQ exposure should also be in the differential!

References

  1. Dudewich M, Danesh A, Onyima C, et al. Intractable acute pain related to fluoroquinolone-induced peripheral neuropathy. J Pain Pall Care Pharmacotherapy 2017;31:144-7. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28358229
  2. Etminan M, Brophy JM, Samii A. Oral fluoroquinolone use and risk of peripheral neuropathy: A pharmacoepidemiologic study.Neurology 2014;83:1261-63. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25150290
  3. Ali AK. Peripheral neuropathy and Guillain-Barre syndrome risks associated with exposure to systemic fluorquinolones: a pharmacovigilance analysis. Ann Epidemiol 2014; 24:279-85. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24472364
  4. Francis JK, Higgins E. Permanent peripheral neuropathy: A case report on a rare but serious debilitating side-effect of fluroquinolone administration. Journal Investigative Medicine High Impact Case Reports 2014; 1-4. DOI:10.1177/2324709614545225. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26425618
  5. FDA.https://www.fda.gov/Drugs/DrugSafety/ucm511530.htm.  Accessed December 8, 2017.
My diabetic patient complains of new onset tingling, burning, and numbness in her feet and ankles while taking levofloxacin for sinusitis. Could it be the antibiotic?