My previously healthy patient developed a viral illness with fever and headache few days after swimming in a community pool. Can swimming pools be a source of viral infection?

Yes! Swimming pools have been implicated in the transmission of a variety of pathogens,  including enteric viruses (eg, echovirus, coxackie virus, hepatitis A virus, norovirus) which account for nearly one-half of all swimming pool-related outbreaks.  Adenoviruses also account for a significant number of swimming pool outbreaks.1,2

The most commonly reported symptoms in swimming pool outbreaks have been gastroenteritis, respiratory symptoms and conjunctivitis. However, aseptic meningitis and hepatitis may also occur. 1

Because viruses cannot replicate in the environment outside of host tissues, their presence in swimming pool is the result of direct contamination by those in the water who may shed viruses through unintentional fecal release or through body fluids, such as saliva, mucus, or vomitus.  The finding of E. coli in 58% of pool water samples in 1 CDC study suggests the presence of stool as a primary source of infection.3

On average, each person has 0.14 grams (range 0.1 gram to 10 grams) of fecal material on their perianal surface that could rinse into the water if pre-swim shower with soap is omitted.4-5 Coupled with the potential for inadequate disinfection or chlorination of pool water, it is not surprising that swimming pools may serve as a source of infection.  

CDC recommends keeping feces and urine out of the water, checking the chlorine level and pH before getting into the water and not swallowing the water you swim in.3 

Bonus pearl: Did you know that pool water has also been associated with Cryptosporidium and Giardia and waterslides with E.coli-0157 outbreaks?

If you liked this post, sign up under MENU and catch future pearls right into your inbox!

References

  1. Bonadonna L, La Rosa G. A review and update on waterborne viral diseases associated with swimming pools. Int j Environ Res Public Health 2019;16, 166. Doi:10.3390/ijerph16020166. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6352248/
  2. Keswick BH, Gebra CP, Goyal SM. Occurrence of enteroviruses in community swimming pools. Am J Public Health 1981;71:1026030. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6267950
  3. CDC.Microbes in pool filter backwash as evidence of the need for improved swimmer hygiene—Metro-Atlanta, Georgia, 2012. MMWR 2013;62:385-88. https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6219a3.htm
  4. Gerba CP. Assessment of enteric pathogen shedding by bathers during recreational activity and its impact on water quality. Quant Microbiol 2000; 2:55-68 https://arizona.pure.elsevier.com/en/publications/assessment-of-enteric-pathogen-shedding-by-bathers-during-recreat
  5. CDC. Model Aquatic Health Code. 8.0 Annexes: fecal/vomit/blood contamination response Annex (6.0 policies and management), 2008. https://www.cdc.gov/healthywater/pdf/swimming/pools/mahc/structure-content/mahc-fecal-vomit-blood-contamination-response-annex.pdf
  6. CDC. Surveillance of waterborne disease outbreaks and other health events associated with recreational water—United States, 2007-2008 and surveillance of waterborne disease outbreaks associated with drinking water—United States, 2007-2008. MMWR 2011;60. 1-76. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21937976

 

 

My previously healthy patient developed a viral illness with fever and headache few days after swimming in a community pool. Can swimming pools be a source of viral infection?

My patient with diabetes mellitus is now admitted with pneumonia. Does diabetes increase the risk of pneumonia requiring hospitalization?

The weight of the evidence to date suggests that diabetes mellitus (DM) does increase the risk of pneumonia-related hospitalization.1-3

A large population-based study involving over 30,000 patients found an adjusted relative risk (RR) of hospitalization with pneumonia of 1.26 (95% C.I 1.2-1.3) among patients with DM compared to non-diabetics.  Of note, the risk of pneumonia-related hospitalization was significantly higher in type 1 as well as type 2 DM and among patients whose A1C level was ≥9.1  Another population-based study found a high prevalence of DM (25.6%) in patients hospitalized with CAP, more than double that in the population studied.2  A 2016 meta-analysis of observational studies also found increased incidence of respiratory tract infections among patients with diabetes (OR 1.35, 95% C.I. 1.3-1.4).

Not only does DM increase the risk of pneumonia-related hospitalization, but it also appears to adversely affect its outcome with increased in-hospital mortality.2 Among patients with type 2 DM,  excess mortality has also been reported at 30 days, 90 days and 1 year following hospitalization for pneumonia. 4,5 More specifically, compared to controls with CAP, 1 year mortality of patients with DM was 30% (vs 17%) in 1 study. 4

Potential reasons for the higher incidence of pneumonia among patients with DM include increased risk of aspiration (eg, in the setting of gastroparesis, decreased cough reflex), impaired immunity (eg, chemotaxis, intracellular killing), pulmonary microangiopathy and coexisting morbidity. 1,3,5,6

Bonus Pearl: Did you know that worldwide DM has reached epidemic levels, such that if DM were a nation, it would surpass the U.S. as the 3rd most populous country! 7

If you liked this post, sign up under MENU and catch future fresh pearls straight into your mailbox!

References

  1. Kornum JB, Thomsen RW, RUS A, et al. Diabetes, glycemic control, and risk of hospitalization with pneumonia. A population-based case-control study. Diabetes Care 2008;31:1541-45. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17595354
  2. Martins M, Boavida JM, Raposo JF, et al. Diabetes hinders community-acquired pneumonia outcomes in hospitalized patients. BMJ Open Diabetes Research and Care 2016;4:e000181.doi:10.1136/bmjdrc-2015000181. https://drc.bmj.com/content/4/1/e000181
  3. Abu-Ahour W, Twells L, Valcour J, et al. The association between diabetes mellitus and incident infections: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies. BMJ Open Diabetes Research and Care 2017;5:e000336. https://drc.bmj.com/content/5/1/e000336. 
  4. Falcone M, Tiseo G, Russo A, et al. Hospitalization for pneumonia is associated with decreased 1-year survival in patients with type 2 diabetes. Results from a prospective cohort study. Medicine 2016;95:e2531. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26844461
  5. Kornum JB, Thomsen RW, Rus A, et al. Type 2 diabetes and pneumonia outcomes. A population-based cohort study. Diabetes Care 2007;30:2251-57. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17595354
  6. Koziel H, Koziel MJ. Pulmonary complications of diabetes mellitus. Pneumonia. Infect Dis Clin North Am 1995;9:65-96. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7769221
  7. Zimmet PZ. Diabetes and its drivers: the largest epidemic in human history? Clinical Diabetes and Endocrinology 2017;3:1 https://clindiabetesendo.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s40842-016-0039-3  

 

My patient with diabetes mellitus is now admitted with pneumonia. Does diabetes increase the risk of pneumonia requiring hospitalization?

My patient with acute exacerbation of heart failure and pulmonary edema also has pneumonia. How often do heart failure and pneumonia coexist?

More often than you might think! The relationship between pneumonia and heart failure (HF) appears bidirectional with pneumonia precipitating heart failure (HF) and HF predisposing to it.

Although It’s often quoted that acute respiratory tract infection accounts for 3-16% of patients hospitalized with decompensated heart failure (HF) (based primarily on small observational studies),1 a 2016 large prospective study involving nearly 100,000 HF admission from 305 US hospitals has reported “pneumonia/respiratory process” as the most common precipitating clinical factor, present in 28.2% of cases (arrhythmia and medication noncompliance came in as 2nd and 3rd).2

Interestingly, the same study reported that pneumonia/respiratory process was most prevalent among patients with preserved (≥50%) ejection fraction (EF) compared to those with borderline ( 40%-49%) or reduced (<40%) EF (33% vs 30% vs 24%, respectively). 2

Pulmonary edema may in turn predispose to bacterial pneumonia through adverse effects of edema fluid on lung bacterial defense mechanisms and establishment of a culture medium for bacterial growth by the presence of fluid in the alveolar space.3

So don’t be surprised if you have to treat for both!

 

References

  1. Thomsen RW, Kasatpibal N, Riis A, et al. The impact of pre-existing heart failure on pneumonia prognosis: Population-based cohort study. J Gen Intern Med 2008;23:1407-13. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18574639
  2. Kapoor JR, Kapoor R, Ju C, et al. Precipitating clinical factors, heart failure characterization, and outcomes in patients hospitalized with heart failure with reduced, borderline, and preserved ejection fraction. JACC 2016;4:464-72. https://www.scholars.northwestern.edu/en/publications/precipitating-clinical-factors-heart-failure-characterization-and 
  3. Harris GD, Woods DE, Fine R, et al. The effect of intraalveolar fluid on lung bacterial clearance. Lung 1980; 158;91-100 Harris GD, Woods DE, Fine R, et al. The effect of intraalveolar fluid on lung bacterial clearance. Lung 1980; 158;91-100. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/BF02713708

 

If you liked this post, sign up under MENU and get future pearls straight into your mailbox!

My patient with acute exacerbation of heart failure and pulmonary edema also has pneumonia. How often do heart failure and pneumonia coexist?